Public Views of Arts and Entertainment

Entertainment art and entertainments gallery is not, as publication would have it, a pale imitation of art which happens to propound for a public audience the same values that art does for the elite members of the self-same cultural group.

Rather, art and entertainment are but similar activities. Art engenders thoughts and emotions in its audience so that they can be referred to a meaning,

While entertainment creates thoughts and painters museums art gallery emotions in its audience that create pleasure for that audience by allowing its members to notice that the events art and entertainments before them engendered those thoughts and emotions. Acrobats create fear with their daring, and the audience enjoys its sense gallery art of fear because it knows that the events before it created that fear. Mystery tales generate galleries suspense by piling up yet clues and suspense, the public audiences enjoy the puzzle as well as the atmosphere of painters contemporary the fiction in which the puzzle is set.

Games of cards and sports are two sources of entertainment because their audiences attend to the particular way a game is played out whether a declarer should have led a spade and whether a squeeze bunt might have led art museum a runner to score– rather than for any sources to be a participant to the play of chance or athletic prowess.

Entertainment is more popular than art because it limits what its audience is required to do to the apprehension of what happens before it, gallery art while art opens up the audience to any associations its members might make between the art object and life.art and entertainments art museum and entertainments paintings contemporary

Arts and Entertainment News from Hollywood North

Boys Come… Boy’s Co.

“John Lennon & Yoko Ono Bed-In for Peace”

Ask any girl. Those rules were bent Friday night when I happened upon old flame David Goldman still going strong at his Boy’s Co exclusive opening of “All We Are Saying” – a fashionable evening featuring the original photographs of “John Lennon & Yoko Ono’s Bed-In for Peace” by the late photojournalist Gerry Deiter.

These extraordinary photographs, providing the backdrop for the theme of the evening, were on display through the sagacity of the Elliott Louis Gallery’s owner Ted Lederer – who single-handedly dragged them out of Deiter’s vault for a first-time showing on May 26, 2004 – thirty-five years after John Lennon and Yoko Ono went to bed in a suite in Montreal’s Queen Elizabeth Hotel, and invited the entire world to join them in seeking an alternative to violence and war in solving global political and social problems.

May 26, 1969. That month the battle of Dong Ap Bia, a.k.a. Hamburger Hill was exploding in the Vietnam War. Race riots occurred in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. French Foreign Legion paratroopers landed in Kolwezi, Zaire, to rescue Europeans caught in the middle of a civil war. U.S. National Guard helicopters sprayed skin-stinging powder on anti-war protesters in California. It was two years after the Summer of Love.

John and Yoko were in room 1742 of the Queen Elizabeth Hotel in Montreal. Early in the Bed-In, a reporter asked John what he was trying to do. John said, “All we are saying is give peace a chance.” Putting sounds to the thought, he rented an 8-track tape machine from a local music store and, on May 31 while in bed, recorded the first solo by a single Beatle,” Give Peace a Chance”, – the recording was attended by dozens of journalists and various celebrities, including Timothy Leary, Petula Clark, Dick Gregory and Canada’s Tommy Smothers.

Gerry Deiter was there for the entire eight days. He was assigned to photograph the Bed-In for Peace by Life Magazine but Life never ran the feature. Ironically, it fell victim to a bigger story – the death of Ho Chi Minh, leader of North Vietnam.

Deiter kept the negatives and transparencies locked away for more than 30 years. He had been living aboard a classic wooden motor yacht cruising the wilderness of the British Columbia coast photographing and writing when Ted Lederer, with the help of family and friends, prevailed on him to bring this archive to life and offer the work to the public at the Elliott Louis Gallery in 2004. This amazing work offers up 25 images in colour and black and white that celebrate John and Yoko’s example of peace and love.

What brought the Boy’s Co show together were Goldman and Lederer meeting up on the field where their sons play soccer. It was a confluence that allowed for a new generation to have a special glimpse of an older one.

Disenchanted fan, Mark David Chapman, murdered Lennon on December 8, 1980. The world is still at war. This retrospective clearly speaks to Lennon’s prescience.

Good on Deiter, Goldman and Lederer for keeping his mission in our faces.

Devorah Macdonald is a freelance writer living and working in Vancouver, British Columbia. Her professional career began as a disc jockey in California, Seattle and her hometown of Vancouver BC.

Vancouver Magazine, in an article titled ‘Video Vixen’, hailed her as having “the best female voice in radio locally,” going on to compare her world-weary delivery with Linda Ellerbee, formerly of the ‘Today Show’ and the award winning ‘Nick News’.

A ten-year retirement devoted to creating three children, “one of each,” according to Macdonald, now allows time write on music, movies and television.

Dining and Entertainment When in Turkey on Honeymoon

Dining and Entertainment when in Turkey

Turkish cuisine consists of the finest and most renowned delicacies in the world. The weather guarantees a steady supply of fresh produce, and this, mixed with the locals’ love of coffee and a good time, give the cuisine its distinctive edge.

Traditional Turkish Delights

Just about everyone is familiar with Turkey’s renowned kebabs, but there are other foods waiting to entice you as well. Available in almost every restaurant is meze, a range of small bite sized appetizers that combine cheeses, fruits and stuffed vegetables. The perfect accompaniment to this is the local alcoholic drink called Raki. It is a spirit flavored with anise, and is clear in appearance. Much is made of mealtime in Turkey, and you will be delighted to find local specialties as well as familiar favorites when it’s time to dine.

Calling All Shoppers

Shoppers in Turkey will enjoy a wide range of merchandise to tempt every pocketbook. Leather goods, jewelry, copper and ceramic goods as well as the traditional carpets and kilims are everywhere. Many shopping venues have flexible hours, and in the summer months stay open late, so that tourists can shop in the cooler climes of the evening. Remember to haggle when you visit the local open air stalls or souvenir shops. Turkish vendors will expect you to negotiate a bit for the price, and will actually be disappointed if you pay the asking price right away!

Turkish Nightlife

Turkish nightlife is quite low-key. Local citizens are content to enjoy a traditional meal at home with the family or dine out at a restaurant. If you are looking to dance the night away, you would be best advised to explore what the large resorts have to offer. The coastal villages consider a walk along the shore, and window shopping, their version of nightlife, so if you are looking for something wilder, you will have to seek it out at the restaurants, shops and bars of the bigger resorts.

What Else to Do when You Visit Turkey

Aquatic pursuits such as canoeing, jet skiing, parasailing, and windsurfing are offered near the top tourist spots and resorts. If you prefer to explore beneath the sea, Turkey has excellent waters for snorkeling and diving for both the expert and the beginner. Trekking the mountains and countryside have become popular ways to see the sites and there is a plethora of historic sites, museums and art galleries scattered across the country to explore.